Aging Specialist Offering Two New Courses This Spring (Winnipeg)

7fd3c75caf166af80aef7cb58709152dWinnipeg, Manitoba – There are two new courses being offered by Angela Gentile, a registered clinical social worker. Angela has a Master’s degree in Social Work and a graduate specialization in aging. She has worked with many older adults and their families and she has written two books and an app. She is passionate about helping people and exploring what it means to age well. Attend these informative and interactive sessions and get Angela’s professional advice. Come away feeling confident and empowered.

10 Tips for Graceful Aging

Learn what you can do to help yourself thrive in your middle years and beyond. The dimensions of wellness will also be covered.

►Date and Time: Tuesday April 25, 2017; 7:00 – 9:00 pm.

►Location: St. James Civic Centre, 2055 Ness Avenue, Winnipeg Manitoba.

►Fee: $25.00

When a Loved One Has Memory Loss

Are you living with or do you know someone who has been experiencing memory loss and you’re not sure how to help? Get some information and tips on how to approach this sensitive and difficult topic.

►Date and Time: Thursday May 11, 2017;  7:00 – 9:00 pm.

►Location: St. James Civic Centre, 2055 Ness Avenue, Winnipeg Manitoba.

►Fee: $25.00

Registration Information:

Both courses are listed in the City of Winnipeg Leisure Guide, Spring/Summer 2017 pages 69 and 70. See page 4 of the guide for registration information which begins Wednesday March 15, 2017 at 8:00 am. It can be done online, by phone, or in-person. Limited spots available!

Contact Angela toll-free at: 1-(855) 974-4219 or online at www.AngelaGGentile.com for more information.

Eternal Love

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Image courtesy of Ben Schonewille at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

 

As a geriatric specialist, I hear all kinds of stories. A nurse colleague told me this touching love story (I have changed the details to protect anonymity). – Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW.

 

One time I was speaking to a man who told me the love story about his parents Gerald (82) and Mary (80) who both had dementia. They had been married for almost 60 years.

Gerald’s dementia was more advanced that his wife’s so he was moved into a Personal Care Home. Mary moved into a seniors’ residence, which was attached to the long-term care centre.

Soon after, Mary’s needs progressed to the point where she needed to be moved into the Personal Care Home as well.

Gerald had no memory of his wife, but soon fell in love with his new neighbour, Mary (who was actually his wife.) He spent every waking minute with her.

One day, Mary needed to be rushed to the hospital. Not long after her hospital admission, she died.

After having no luck finding his love again, Gerald gave up. He died 37 days after Mary’s death.

It looks like eternal love is possible after all.

 

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Angela G. Gentile  MSW, RSW is a clinical social worker and author of the book, “Caring for a Husband with Dementia: The Ultimate Survival Guide”, “A Book About Burnout: One Social Worker’s Tale of Survival” and the “Dementia Caregiver Solutions” app for iPhone and iPad. She lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba with her husband and two adult children. She is passionate about all things related to Aging Well. For more information, visit: www.AngelaGGentile.com

 

Alzheimer Caregivers Need Help, Too

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Courtesy of the Fort Frances Times

I enjoyed presenting at the Alzheimer Society Forget Me Not Dinner in Fort Frances, Ontario. It was my first out-of-town request to be a guest speaker. It was a sold-out crowd and they raised over $4,000.00.  Duane Hicks did a great job of covering the story. The only thing I would like to correct is that I have two children, a son (Lorenzo) and daughter (Simone). Lorenzo is the app developer for the mobile app, “Dementia Caregiver Solutions.”

 

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Courtesy of Fort Frances Times/Duane Hicks

Above is a picture of my husband, Agapito, and I getting ready to dig in! He was a big help to me as he drove the whole way (4 hours one way). He was my official assistant during my presentation as he advanced the slides for me.

If you would like more information on my services or products, please check out my website, www.AngelaGGentile.com.

Sincerely,

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

This Self-Help Book for Caregivers Educates, Supports and Comforts

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When I titled my book “Caring for a Husband with Dementia: The Ultimate Survival Guide” (2015) I did not expect to have people mistakenly assume that I am a wife caring for a husband with dementia. The warmth and sympathy I receive from people who don’t know me personally has been incredible. I gently explain that I am not a wife caregiver and that the book is inspired by the experience I had in counseling eight amazing caregiving women.

When I was deciding on a topic for my master’s degree final project, I decided to focus on older women. I explored what issues are affecting them, and the subject of caregiving came up quite often. I did some research on the subject and discovered that there was very little written about women who care for husbands with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. My career as a geriatric clinician and social worker exposes me to many different mental health issues, and dementia is unfortunately a common one. I quickly became an expert in assessing and screening for dementia, and recognizing the symptoms of caregiver stress and burnout.

The short-term, individual counseling program I designed, implemented and evaluated with eight caregiving wives was very rewarding and successful. It inspired me to want to help others like the women I had learned so much from. What started out as a small booklet turned into a 16-chapter book. “Caring for a Husband with Dementia” was written specifically to help women who care for husbands who have been diagnosed with a dementing illness such as vascular dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. I dedicated this book to caregiving wives, everywhere.

Writing this book came surprisingly easy to me. I called it a “Divine Intervention.” I received help from colleagues and other experts in the field who generously donated their time reviewing, editing and offering feedback. It is a unique, informative and therapeutic self-help type of book. The book offers opportunity to make it personal for the reader. There is space for self-reflection on important questions. Don’t know what to “Google” to find your local resources? I’ll help with that, too. There is a listing of helpful and important resources, plus more.

All of the reviews and feedback I have received thus far has been very positive. Some of the more helpful feedback has been that this book is written not only for wives, but for all caregivers. I have been told this book is like a bible and it is kept at the bedside and is read every night. It’s a reference guide, a companion, and a source of education and support. It’s like a year’s worth of therapy all in one book.

I know this book has helped spouses and other caregivers. They have told me, “Everything I was thinking, feeling and wondering about was written in this book.” I am honoured to be able to help those who are struggling with the issues of diagnosis, getting help, difficult behaviours, grief and loss, legal issues and more. I have been at book signing events where even men say they want their wives to buy this book as they want them to be prepared – “…just in case.”

My hope is that this book reaches those who are in need of education, support and tips on how to survive the difficult task of caring for a loved one with dementia. It is also a great gift for someone in need.

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

Link to original article on #AlzAuthors, published 23 Nov 2016.

 

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Angela G. Gentile  MSW, RSW. is a clinical social worker and author of the book, “Caring for a Husband with Dementia: The Ultimate Survival Guide”, “A Book About Burnout: One Social Worker’s Tale of Survival” and the “Dementia Caregiver Solutions” app for iPhone and iPad. She lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba with her husband and two adult children. She is passionate about all things related to Aging Well. For more information, visit: www.AngelaGGentile.com

Senior Moments: Should I Be Worried?

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Although I don’t particularly like the term “senior moment,” most older people know what that means. When someone who is at middle age or beyond has difficulty remembering something such as, “Where did I put my reading glasses?” or “I can’t remember her name” he/she may find someone else responding in a joking fashion, “Are you having a ‘senior moment?'” The other person is replying with a joke about having a poor memory. I have heard people themselves make jokes about their own “senior moments” in hopes of making light of the situation. It’s true that as people age there are normally changes in memory and thinking skills. On one end of the spectrum there is normal aging that affects everyone. At the other end is dementia which is common but not normal.  In between is a condition known as mild cognitive impairment. I will touch on all three.

We all have memory lapses on occasion

It’s true we all have occasional lapses in our memory. I even see my teenage children doing it. I even remember walking into a room years ago, forgetting what I went in there for, having to go back to what I was doing in order to jog my memory. Little lapses in memory is common for everyone. We get distracted or side-tracked especially when it is something that is not really that significant. Forgetting names is a common occurrence for example.

I have been working with older adults for over 25 years now and I see all different types of memory and thinking problems. I also know many older people (including caregivers) who do not show any signs of cognitive (brain function) decline.

I often note increased anxiety in people who are struggling with the loss of cognitive abilities. It must be a scary feeling to know that they are losing their faculties.

One of the common fears people have is developing dementia. Declining memory skills are often one of the first signs of dementia. The good news is that memory problems do not always lead to dementia.

Normal aging, mild cognitive impairment and dementia

Slowed thinking and minor problems with remembering things is quite common and almost expected in our later years. There are some things we can do to help reduce our risks of further problems with our cognition such as exercising (to get the blood pumping to our organs including the brain) and doing brain exercises (such as crosswords and learning a new musical instrument). Normal aging causes us to slow down in more ways than one.

Sometimes our memory problems become more problematic and they are noticed by other people. If you are continuously forgetting someone’s name or miss appointments, this may start to interfere with your relationships and daily functioning. You may have to learn new ways of coping with the normal changes in your brain such as keeping lists handy and using your calendar more regularly. Memory and thinking problems that can be noticed by others but don’t really affect your day-to-day functioning is called Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI).

By the way, it’s a good sign if a person is aware of or concerned about their changing memory skills as one of the skills lost in dementia is the ability to know they have problems with their memory. If you ask someone with dementia if he/she has memory problems, he/she will most likely say “No.” It’s true that long term memory may still be intact.  It’s the ability to remember recent events and learn new information that is lost.

In some cases your memory skills, thinking and cognitive functioning may be impaired to the point where you can no longer do things on your own. For example, you may need someone to give you your medication on a daily basis or else you will forget. Or you can no longer drive because your sense of direction is off. Dementia is a syndrome and can be found in a variety of conditions  that affect cognition (such as Alzheimer’s disease). In early stages of dementia you can  live on your own as long as you can enlist the support you need to keep yourself safe. Dementia can create a variety of problems. For example, sometimes people with dementia forget to eat, or think they have already eaten. In this case it’s important to have someone provide a reminder or stop by to ensure he/she eats. In the later stages of dementia, it is not possible to live alone.

Seek a memory assessment if you are concerned

If you are concerned about your memory skills or other brain-related functions (such as language, problem-solving or judgment skills), please speak to your doctor for a memory assessment. Let your doctor know if you are concerned your problems are beyond the changes seen in normal aging (such as slowed thinking, and the occasional difficulty remembering things). Only a skilled practitioner can diagnose and determine the difference between normal aging, mild cognitive impairment and dementia, and provide treatment and management solutions.

For more information, check out Aging, Memory Loss and Dementia: What’s the Difference? from the Alzheimer’s Association.

You may also like to check out Senior Moments Explained by Terry Hollenbeck, M.D.

 

Angela G. Gentile, MSW RSW

www.AngelaGGentile.com

 

Malnutrition: A Hidden Epidemic in Older Adults

Over the years, many older adults have let me into their homes because they have been referred to one of the health programs I work for. Part of my job as a geriatric clinician requires me to assess the person and to ask them information about their private lives, including their appetite. I then ask for their height and weight and if they have gained or lost any weight over the last few months. I am even required to ask if it is okay to open their fridges to see what kind of food they consume (I also check expiry dates to be sure no one is neglecting to dispose of rotten food).

Sometimes I come across older adults who have lost a lot of weight. Most of them live on their own. Many of these people have other conditions such as memory loss, decreased mobility, and serious medical problems such as diabetes or heart disease.

Some of the most remarkable weight loss situations in my experience has been found in people with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. Someone with dementia may forget to eat, forget how to prepare a meal, or have a decreased appetite. They may simply forget how to get food (arrange transportation, grocery shop, order groceries) or have an inability to problem solve their situation.

Proper nutrition and hydration are very important to help keep a person’s body (and mind) strong and running optimally. Here’s a great video from Alliance for Aging Research that explains the hidden epidemic of malnutrition in older people.

If the video doesn’t work for you, try this YouTube link: https://youtu.be/iPNZKyXqN1U

Check out the YouTube channel for Alliance for Aging Research for more great videos like this.

 

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

www.AngelaGGentile.com

 

 

Caring for a Loved One with Dementia? You Are Not Alone

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Our society is greying. For the first time in Canada, we now have more older people (65+) than younger people (under 16). Although there are many benefits and advantages to getting older, the unfortunate facts are that as we age we become more susceptible to age-related diseases.

Alzheimer’s disease and other related dementias (also known as neurocognitive disorders) affect one in 11 Canadians aged 65 or older. For those 80 years of age and over, one in three have some form of dementia. Dementia is a syndrome that is usually of a chronic and progressive nature.The symptoms of dementia may include a loss or impairment of brain functions such as:

  • problems with short-term memory
  • confusion or impaired thinking 
  • disorientation to place or time
  • poor comprehension
  • trouble with calculation
  • decreased or loss of learning capacity
  • problems with language
  • poor reasoning
  • decreased judgement

Dementia can cause problems in everyday functioning and activities. People with dementia may not be able to drive safely, or they may get lost while driving to a doctor’s appointment. It may be more difficult for them to remember to take medications on a regular basis. They may get into more arguments with others.

Dementia can sneak up gradually (as in Alzheimer’s disease) or it can come on suddenly (as in a stroke that affects cognition). It can fluctuate day-to- day. Loved ones often have difficulty spotting the signs, and often mistakenly attribute the changes to aging, or a “stubborn” personality. Personality changes in the person with dementia can cause stress for loved ones.

At times it is difficult for family members to recognize the signs of dementia and to act upon them. Sometimes they are in denial, sometimes they hope the situation will improve. Others may not know what to do or who to talk to.

If a person with dementia requires more help, the main helper becomes the “caregiver.” Often a spouse or adult child (usually a daughter) takes over the primary role. The process of changing or incorporating this new caregiving role into the relationship can cause a variety of challenges. Although the person with dementia may not be aware (or be unable to recognize) he/she requires help, the caregiver can learn how to provide the assistance needed with practice, education and support.

In the early stage of Alzheimer’s disease or vascular dementia, the affected person may be aware of his/her memory problems. He/she may notice changes in frustration levels. He/she may be more open to the idea of accepting help. He/she may look to family members for help answering questions or “filling in the blanks.”

Caregiving for a loved one with dementia can be stressful due to increased demands, roles and responsibilities. A caregiver may worry about Dad’s safety with cooking or worry that Mom may wander off. There is also the issue of grieving. A wife may grieve the “loss” of the husband who no longer remembers who she is. A husband may grieve the loss of the future travel plans he had for himself and his wife.

With education, support, self-compassion and self-care practices, the caregiver can have a positive experience of caring for a loved one amidst all of the strain. Seeking out support and knowledge and knowing he/she is not alone are some of the most beneficial things a caregiver can do.

If you have concerns and think someone you know and care about has memory problems and/or dementia, encourage a thorough medical assessment for diagnosis, support and treatment options.

 

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Angela G. Gentile, M.S.W., R.S.W. is a clinical social worker and author of the book, “Caring for a Husband with Dementia: The Ultimate Survival Guide” and the “Dementia Caregiver Solutions” app for iPhone and iPad. She lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba with her husband and two adult children. For more information, visit: www.AngelaGGentile.com

Purple Was the Colour to Wear!

 

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I am so glad I wore my purple suit to the Forget-Me-Not Fair at River Ridge Retirement Residence! When I arrived, there was purple everywhere! It was a very enjoyable event and was a successful fundraiser for the Alzheimer Society of Manitoba. My table was set up at River Ridge Retirement Residence near the “Post Office” and I had many people come by to ask questions about my book, other products and services.

There were about 7-8 other vendors onsite as well. I added their information to my website, “The Grey Pages – Winnipeg.” The other vendors I saw there were Wright 1 Care Inc., Friendly Caregiver Seniors Care, S.M.I.L.E. Fitness, Silvert’s Adaptive Clothing and Footwear, and Comfort Keepers. There were a couple of others I didn’t get around to connecting with.

The fundraiser included selling a potted pansy which got the purchaser’s name into a raffle.IMG_4538

When it came to my turn, I spoke to about 60 people. It was a full house. Some even watched from the upper balcony! My topic was Dementia Caregiving and I used a power point presentation format. I referred to my book, “Caring for a Husband with Dementia: The Ultimate Survival Guide.” and educated the audience on dementia, caregiving, signs and symptoms of dementia, and what you can do. I also referred to my mobile app for iPhone and iPad called, “Dementia Caregiver Solutions” as well as my other services such as counselling and consulting. The audience was very attentive and some questions were asked about Lewy Body dementia and Frontotemporal dementia. A few were concerned about their own memory problems. Some current and former caregivers were there as well.

After I went back to my table, I answered many questions about memory concerns, family issues and how to get a diagnosis. My candies were a hit and all the jellies went very quickly (note to self-bring more jellies next time!).  I sold four copies of my book after the presentation.
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The other speaker was Elizabeth Murray, another Winnipeg author, who wrote a book called, “Holding on to Mamie. My Mother, Dementia and Me.” We swapped books. I am looking forward to reading her book as well.

I am very grateful to Leslie Fiorino, Director of Health and Wellness for inviting me to speak at the River Ridge Forget-Me-Not Fair. I am also grateful for all the new connections I have made. I look forward to more speaking engagements and providing education and support on all things related to aging and growing older.

Thanks for reading!

For more information on me, my products and services, please go to www.AngelaGGentile.com.

Have a great day!

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

 

Drinking and Dementia Don’t Mix: How Families Can Help

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Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

People with dementia who are also experiencing alcoholism or alcohol abuse is a very challenging situation for family members to manage. Alcoholism speeds the decline in the skills needed for independent living, worsens behavioural problems, and raises concerns of safety for the affected family member and those living with/caring for them. This is in addition to the known health risks of alcoholism (e.g., cirrhosis of the liver, alcohol withdrawal syndrome and death).

Statistics reveal that 40% of adults 65 and over drink alcohol. We also know that almost 15% of older adults have Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. The issues surrounding dementia and alcohol are becoming more prevalent as our society ages. We need to work together to find solutions to manage this difficult situation.

For families who are caring for a loved one with dementia such as Alzheimer’s, alcohol use becomes extremely challenging. The person is already impaired cognitively (in thinking, memory and processing information) and adding alcohol to the situation makes it much worse. A person with memory impairment may not appreciate how much s/he is drinking and will often neglect nourishment and basic hydration. It is even harder for family members to keep on top of things when the loved one lives independently. I have seen this problem in many settings such as when the person lives alone, or with family members, or in long-term care.

Family members ask what can be done. There are a few things that can be tried; however, there is not a clear-cut answer. I would like to share with you some of the common problems and solutions related to drinking and dementia.

Problems:

• A person who consumes a lot of alcohol on a regular basis may start to neglect his or her own hygiene and health care. Self-neglect is often the first sign that alerts family members that something is not right.

• Certain medications and alcohol do not mix. For example, a sleeping pill taken with alcohol can cause increased confusion. Be aware of over-the-counter sleep aides that often contain diphenhydramine (e.g., Benadryl).

• The person with dementia is already impaired — becoming intoxicated makes matters worse. Increased confusion, risky behaviour and falls can cause complications. Falling can cause bruises, cuts, sprains and fractures and can lead to hospitalization.

• Against his or her better judgement, an intoxicated person may decide to go for a drive. Remove the keys or disable the car if this poses a potential risk.

• If the person lives in a rental suite, s/he may face risk of eviction. If the person neglects to care for the home environment and/or him or herself, co-tenants may complain of fruit flies, rodents or odours (like urine due to mismanaged incontinence). Other tenants may not like the fact there are risks associated with the person smoking (fire hazard). The person with alcohol dependence may not pay the utility bills, or fail to pay rent. These are all grounds for eviction if the situation is not rectified.

• Some people develop life-threatening illnesses related to drinking, such as cirrhosis of the liver. They are told they should stop drinking, but forget that they were told. They may need to be in a 24-hour secured facility to keep them healthy and alcohol-free. This is only when deemed incompetent or incapable of understanding the risks.

• People with dementia and/or alcoholism may confabulate. This is when a person unintentionally lies about the facts. They appear to be telling the truth, but in fact, it is all made up. This makes it difficult for family members to trust their loved one and get a true sense of what is going on.

• Nutritional deficiencies can occur in people who have alcoholism. They tend to drink a lot of alcohol, but usually don’t eat enough foods containing thiamine, or vitamin B1. Thiamine is naturally found in fruits and vegetables. This continues to cause damage to the brain and body (Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome) which may be irreversible.

Practical Tips for Helping a Loved One with Dementia Stay Safe:

• Remove all alcohol from the home. If necessary, replace it with non-alcoholic beverages such as low-alcohol or non-alcoholic beer or wine.

• Put the person’s address on the “Do Not Deliver” bottle delivery list. Some bottle delivery programs will accept a letter from a doctor or another person in authority, such as the person assigned Durable Power of Attorney. Call your local liquor commission to inquire about this option.

• Let all other family members and friends know that you would like them to refrain from bringing alcohol to the person.

• Keep the person busy with other activities.

• Find out what is motivating the person to drink. Could it be loneliness, stress, anxiety, depression or grieving? Find solutions to these underlying causes.

• If possible, limit access to funds they use to pay for the alcohol.

• Contact your local addictions organization for more support. Join an Al-Anon Peer or Family Group.

• Know your limits as a family member/caregiver. Look after yourself first. The overuse of alcohol likely predated the dementia and will likely be a difficult behaviour to change. A loved one with dementia is unable to appreciate (or remember appreciating) that there is a problem.

• Get your loved one assessed by a specialist. Geriatric Psychiatrists are experienced in this area. It is difficult to determine the level of cognitive impairment when someone is under the influence.

• Enlist the help and support from other family members and friends.

• Consider Family Counselling to work on the issues together.

• Pursue individual psychotherapy if you are feeling guilty, struggling with the change in roles, or grieving the loss of your loved one.

• Contact your local Alzheimer’s organization for more support and tips.

Solutions:

• Detoxification and rehabilitation are difficult and usually impossible for persons who have irreversible brain damage from chronic alcoholism. I have seen situations where the person is hospitalized, detoxed (removing toxins and abstaining from alcohol), then move to a secured facility for older adults which offers either no access to, or controlled access to alcohol. Voluntary recovery is almost impossible in persons with dementia. A person needs certain mental abilities to benefit from rehabilitation (restoring to optimal health and functioning). Most programs are based on cognitive-behavioural changes, which is not possible for someone with mid to late-stage dementia. A person with mild or early stages of dementia may be able to benefit.

• I have seen success in persons who have dementia and whose lives were derailed by alcoholism when they are detoxed in hospital, then moved to a supportive environment where there is no access to alcohol. They benefit from living in a secured environment where they have stimulation, supervision and activities. They thrive with regularly scheduled meals, medications, and personal care assistance. In my community, these facilities are called Supportive Housing or Personal Care Homes (also known as Nursing Homes.) One unfortunate (or fortunate?) side-effect of this is that the person thrives and does so well that he or she may get to the point where it appears that s/he will be safe and capable of living independently. We fear that once the person moves out and lives independently, they will start drinking again. With proper supports and increased diligence (although the person may not see a need for it) it is possible for them to move home.

Preventative Measures:

Families can encourage older adults to ensure that Power of Attorney, Wills and a Living Will/Advanced Health Care Directive is prepared well ahead of time. This will help prevent any major problems down the road — for example, when it comes time to sell property.

If you or someone you know has an addiction to alcohol, seek medical advice or call your local addictions organization. Education and support are key to aid in prevention and treatment of this challenging situation.

 

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Angela G. Gentile, M.S.W., R.S.W. is an author and specialist in aging with more than 25 years of experience working with older adults and their families in a variety of capacities. She has written a book called “Caring for a Husband with Dementia: The Ultimate Survival Guide” and a mobile app for iOS called “Dementia Caregivers Solutions.” When she’s not working, she enjoys writing, traveling, photography and exploring what it means to age well. She is a realistic optimist who lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba with her husband and two children. Find her online at angelaggentile.com.

Photo credit: “Dandelion Wine” by Sattva @ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Blogs and Newsletters I Follow

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I have been following a number of great bloggers over the years. These writers have been posting about issues related to aging and I appreciate their positive and proactive take on growing older. Sometimes they are amusing, sometimes they are educational. Usually they are insightful and entertaining.

I also subscribe to a few newsletters related to aging and elder care. This is a great way to keep up with current topics.

I receive their posts and newsletters directly to my email inbox. It’s very convenient.

Please consider signing up to receive these blog posts and newsletters. I am sure they would be thrilled to see new followers. Here are my favourites in no particular order:

Blogs:

Time Goes By: What it’s really like to get old by Ronni Bennett

The Generation Above Me by Karen D. Austin

Lines of Beauty: A blog about aging naturally, one wrinkle at a time by Louise Cady Fernandes

Aging Investors by Dr. Mikol Davis and Carol Rosenblatt, R.N., Attorney

Aging But Dangerous

Points of Life org

Newsletters:

Caregiving Matters

Dementia News and Knowledge by Karen Tyrell, Personalized Dementia Solutions

Comforts Connection by Comforts of Home Care

Senior Living from A Place for Mom

The Caregiver’s Voice by Brenda Avadian

ElderCare Matters

Prime Women

Coming of Age NYC

Help for Dedicated Caregivers by Maria Marley, Ph.D.

My Elder Advocate by Jack Halpern, CEO

AlzLive: For those who care

SMARTLiving365

The Taos Institute – Positive Aging Newsletter

 

Have something to add? Please let me know.

Have a great day!

Angela G. Gentile, MSW RSW

Specialist in Aging

http://www.angelaggentile.com