Dry January – A Month Without Alcohol

Photo by Roberto Vivancos on Pexels.com

Dry January is an annual event in which people choose to abstain from alcohol for the month of January. The campaign, which originated in the United Kingdom, encourages participants to give their bodies a break from alcohol and to reflect on their relationship with drinking.

The health benefits of abstaining from alcohol for a month are well-documented. Alcohol is a major contributor to liver disease, and giving the liver a break can help to reduce the risk of developing these conditions. Abstaining from alcohol can also improve sleep quality and help promote weight loss. It can help save money. Additionally, taking a break from drinking can help to improve mental clarity and reduce stress.

Participating in Dry January can also be an opportunity for individuals to reflect on their relationship with alcohol. Many people use alcohol as a way to cope with stress, anxiety, and other emotional issues, but this can lead to a cycle of dependence that can be difficult to break. By abstaining from alcohol for a month, individuals can gain a new perspective on their drinking habits and determine if they need to make changes to their relationship with alcohol.

However, it is worth mentioning that for people with certain medical conditions, history of alcohol use disorder or those who are recovering from addiction, the decision to take part in Dry January should be discussed with a healthcare professional.

In addition to the personal benefits, Dry January also serves as a way to raise awareness about the negative effects of alcohol on health and society. The campaign encourages people to think critically about alcohol and its role in their lives, which can lead to long-term changes in attitudes and behaviors.

Overall, Dry January provides an opportunity for individuals to improve their health, reflect on their relationship with alcohol, and raise awareness about the negative effects of alcohol. It’s an annual tradition that allows people to start the new year with a healthier lifestyle and a new perspective on drinking habits.

I have decided to take a break from drinking alcohol for the month of January in the year 2023, starting on the 2nd. I know a few others who are on this journey with me. I consider it a reboot or reset of sorts. I am already well into the experience and I am reaping the benefits. I will report back in more detail when my 31 “dry” days are behind me.

You can start at any time. Who else wants to give it a go?

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

Written with the help of chat.openai.com. 

Advertisement

Quality Senior Services Has a New Member! (Me)

Quality Senior Services – Trusted Professionals for All Your Needs. Member Angela G. Gentile.

Who can you trust to provide you with services and products that tried, tested, and true? Who do you call when you need professional services, products, or advice? If you are not sure, I have the answer for you!

I am proud to announce I am now a member of the Quality Senior Services network of trusted professionals in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Who are we?

We are dedicated to providing quality products and services to seniors.

Are you a senior looking for assistance or someone caring for an older person? The goal of QSS is to help meet the diverse needs of older adults providing easy access to a variety of products and services. Call one of our trusted professionals or visit our website at qualityseniorservices.com to discover how SQQ members can help you or someone you care about.

Quality Senior Services, 2023

Our brochure and website lists an impressive variety of professionals, including:

  • Realtor
  • Financial Planner
  • Disability Tax Credit Advisor
  • Licensed Insolvency Trustee (Accountant)
  • Lawyer
  • Mortgage Broker
  • Clinical Social Worker (me!)
  • Dental Care
  • Nurse Practitioner
  • Pharmacist
  • Speech and Swallowing Therapy (SLP)
  • Private Home Care
  • Home Medical Supplies
  • Professional Movers, Transition Specialists, and Estate Sales
  • Funeral Services
  • and MORE!

Quality Seniors Services (QSS) was founded in 2007 to provide a trusted and reliable space for seniors and caregivers alike, to find credible professionals with a strong rapport in the older adult community. QSS strives to offer a comprehensive variety of health services providers, professional service providers, and quality of life services providers. Each member of QSS is held to a high standard and is required to have an up-to-date criminal record check, vulnerable persons abuse registry check, and industry certification and professional requirements.

Quality Senior Services, 2023

Many of our members provide mobile or home visits. Accessibility is key. We know.

Our membership is always evolving and we are open to having new members who provide services to older adults and their families. All service providers are vetted and trusted, whether they are health sector, quality of life, or general professionals. We all come with a wealth of experience.

You will see us out at the “Pros Know Expos” and we are always willing to chat with you about your needs.

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

Clinical Social Worker for Quality Senior Services

Complete the form below for more information on QSS or email us at qseniorservice@gmail.com.

Energy Healing – A Metaphysical Experience

Priscilla (L) and I in the treatment room at Just for Today Reiki

I went to my first official Reiki session and it was fabulous! The experience left me feeling more happy, settled, and confident, right down to my soul. Priscilla Robert, certified Medium, Reiki Master, Crystal Therapy Practitioner, delighted and thrilled me in a one hour Reiki session.

Just for Today Reiki

Priscilla practices out the the “Just for Today Reiki and Holistic Services” clinic at 806 Osborne Street in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Once I found the place, I had a little trouble finding parking. I found a free parking spot on Clare Avenue, which was nearby.

The door was open when I arrived. To the right was a small reception desk with lots of interesting items for sale. The sign painted on the wall, “Just for Today”, set the mood. The sign reads: “Just for Today. I will not be angry. I will not worry. I will be grateful. I will do my work honestly. I will be kind to every living thin.”

The second thing I noticed was the smell of burning incense. I am not sure what the fragrance was, but it was pleasant. Not too overwhelming. I hadn’t smelled incense for years, so that was a real treat!

Priscilla greeted me and she was getting the treatment room ready (there are two). I told her a little about what I was dealing with and what kind of help I was looking for. She explained to me that she was going to do a combined treatment, depending on what she felt was needed. There could be a combination of mediumship (spirits, both past and present, around me that have messages for me), Reiki (energy healing), Crystal Therapy, and Chakra balancing. She may be touching my head, but most likely no other body parts would be physically touched. She added that in terms of mediumship, sometimes she sees more than others, so it will all depend on how things go.

The clinic room was warm and had dimmed lights and some candles burning. There was some pleasant, relaxing, instrumental music playing. The volume was very low. She showed me the massage table and said I would be laying on my back. There was a pillow for my head, and one for under my knees. There were sheets and a weighted blanket. The eye pillow would also be used, as she pointed out.

Priscilla said she would leave me for a minute or two, and asked me to get comfortable on the bed. I have had many massages over the years so I had to remember to lay on my back, not my front, as would be required if I was getting a massage. The weighted blanket was a nice touch. I felt safe and secure.

Priscilla came back shortly after and put the eye pillow on me then started the treatment. She walked me through every step of the way. She started with a pendulum, and said she was checking my chakras. If the pendulum went in a circle, that meant my chakras were good.

A big portion of our time together was her use of her gift of mediumship. There were many special messages passed along to me from people who I had been in contact over the years. It was very emotional, touching, enlightening, and sometimes it brought a tear to my eye. There was even a discussion about fairies!

The crystals were also used. There was mention that I should put a big piece of rose quartz near my bedside. I just happened to have purchased a piece of rose quartz so that was perfect advice!

The Reiki portion of the session was very short. She did not touch me, but placed her hands just above my body. I have taken Reiki Level 1 so I understand how this type of energy treatment helps promote balance and healing.

I left with many good words of advice and a clear focus on what I needed to do. I felt enlightened.

Priscilla works with all people including those who have a history of trauma. She said many people who have trauma tend to hold it in their stomachs and a few sessions with her can help heal that trauma. Priscilla is currently accepting new clients.

If you are at all interested in learning more about energy healing, or if you are curious and want to give it a try, I would highly recommend Priscilla Robert. Her bio can be found at ReikiToday.ca. Follow Just for Today Reiki on Facebook. She has a new crystal shop called, “Crystals and Beyond” here in Winnipeg. Contact Priscilla to book an appointment or to find out more about how she can help you.

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

The Ten Dimensions of Wellness from an Aging Well Perspective (Podcast)

Have a listen to my interview with Dr. Andrea Wilkinson on the BrainShape Podcast, “Flourish or Fade with Angela Gentile.” Episode #121.

It was fun being a guest for the second time with Dr. Andrea. My book, Flourish or Fade: A guide to total well-being for women at midlife and beyond is available on Amazon. For more information on Dr. Andrea, please check out her website, https://www.brainshape.ca/ I hope you enjoy the interview!

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

Book News: Updates

I have been working on my books and I have two updates to tell you about.

Now in hardcover: “Flourish or Fade”

My newest book, “Flourish or Fade: A guide to total well-being for women at midlife and beyond” (2021) is now available in hardcover! This is the first book that I have been able to make into a hardcover version. Amazon had approached me to see if I would be interested in trying out this new feature they were offering, so I took them up on it. Let me know if you decided to get a copy of it in hardcover. I would love to know what you think.

Paperback updated for 2021: “Caring for a Husband with Dementia”

I have updated the paperback version of “Caring for a Husband with Dementia” for 2021. I have taken out some links that no longer worked. Many of the links were from the “Alzheimer’s Reading Room” which has been removed off the internet. I have also added a reference to a book by Marie Marley and Daniel C. Potts which has a lot of the information that was in the links which have been removed. Their book is called, “Finding Joy in Alzheimer’s: New Hope for Caregivers” (2015).

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

Cycling to Work for 30 Years

27 Apr 2021

My husband, Agapito, has been cycling to work for the past 30 years. He remembers back in 1991 when he made the decision to ride his bike to work. We were married in 1990, and that winter we had moved into our first house. He had started taking the bus to work, but he found he didn’t like the public transit system. So, he started riding his bike. He never looked back.

Spring 1992. No helmet!
30 Nov 2020

He rides in all kinds of weather. Winnipeg winters can be brutally cold.

26 Jan 2021

His face covering gets all frosty in the cold weather. The winters are hard on bikes and he figures he went through about 7-8 so far. He has always bought used bikes.

04 Dec 2014 – “Tip of the day: Lots of free, all-day parking all over the city, even downtown.” 
04 Sep 2015 – “Got a bit of rain on the commute home. Managed to keep all my valuables dry under the garbage bag.”

He rides rain or shine!

I wonder how long he will continue to ride his bike?

27 Dec 2021

Congratulations on 30 years of cycling, Agapito! I wish you many more years of riding your bike.

Angela G. Gentile

Flourish or Fade: A guide to total well-being for women at midlife and beyond – Book Now Available

Angela Gentile’s newest book is now available for purchase from Amazon.

>>>Buy the Paperback on Amazon ($16.99 USD) 

>>>Buy the ebook (Kindle) on Amazon ($5.99 USD)

TAKE CHARGE OF THE WAY YOU AGE

Flourish or Fade: A guide to total well-being for women at midlife and beyond provides you with the information and tools needed to improve life satisfaction. The Flower of Wellness Method will help you devise a plan to balance your body, mind, and soul. 

You will learn how to enhance your overall well-being by exploring the ten dimensions of wellness: 

Physical, Emotional, Brain, Social, Sexual, Spiritual, Environmental, Recreational, Financial, and Occupational.

This anti-ageist, realistic, and optimistic approach to life in the middle years and beyond will provide you with inspiration and tips that will have you feeling confident, happy, and satisfied with whatever may come your way. 

The Flower of Wellness Method is a fresh and contemporary approach to finding balance.

Do you want to flourish or fade in the later years? It’s your choice. 

Angela G. Gentile, M.S.W., R.S.W., is a registered clinical social worker/specialist in aging with more than 25 years of experience working with older adults and their families. She was born and raised in Ontario and now lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

www.AngelaGGentile.com

“Flourish or Fade” Book Launch Giveaways and Contest Details

Celebrate National Women’s Health Week with us! On May 11, 2021, at 8:00 pm CST, Angela G. Gentile will be hosting a Zoom book launch for her newest book, “Flourish or Fade.” Register on Eventbrite to attend. There are a number of awesome books, services, and products that have been donated by some amazing women to help make this book event special. Please see the list below and enter to win! (see Contest Details below).

Flourish or Fade

1. Angela G. Gentile: “Flourish or Fade: A guide to total well-being for women at midlife and beyond” (paperback, $21.00 CAD value). Now available!

BrainShape Accountability Calls

2. Dr. Andrea Wilkinson: BrainShape Accountability Calls ($300.00 CAD value)

“Free Phase II Accountability Calls with Dr. Andrea of BrainShape” ($300 CAD value)

Accountability Appointments take place via TWO 60-minute video calls. 

CALL 1: Discuss your concerns and struggles + build a plan to help you address them (e.g., sleeping difficulties, chronically stressed, low energy, lacking mental focus, etc.) Whatever the problem, let’s talk about it & build a plan you can implement right away. 

CALL 2: Accountability Appointment to check-in on the goals you set out in Call 1.

The winner of the BrainShape Services prize will book their INITIAL CALL by visiting www.BrainShape.ca/call and book a time in Dr. Andrea’s calendar. This is a free offering of the supportive elements provided inside the Brain Vitality Blueprint, and helps people take the first step towards improving their health and well-being. 

How I Made a Huge Mess of My Life

3. Billie Best: “How I Made a Huge Mess of My Life” (paperback, $12.99 USD value)

https://billiebest.com/

The World Came to Us

4. Molly Duncan Campbell: “The World Came to Us” (paperback, $12.99 USD value)

http://mollydcampbell.com/

The Playground of Possibilities Card Deck

5. Kay Ross: “The Playground of Possibilities” (card deck, $20.00 USD value)

This card deck is a self-help, personal-development tool with 52 questions for you to ask yourself. Every question starts with “What would be possible for me if I…?”, to prompt you to let go of your old, limiting thoughts, beliefs and stories about yourself and the world, choose more useful ones, take inspired action, and improvise more resourceful, joyful ways of being. Kay was born in Scotland, grew up in Australia, and has lived in Hong Kong for 27 years. She’s passionate about personal development and healing, and is also an improv performer. The deck costs $20 USD plus postage from Hong Kong (the full amount depends on the number of decks ordered and the destination).  

https://playgroundofpossibilities.com/card-deck/

Seize the Moment!

6. Camille Goscicki, of Vitalaging4women, “Seize the Moment! A Guide to Living in the Present” (ebook, $4.99 USD value)

Do you live with regrets from the past, and fear the unknowns of the future?

It’s time to let go of fears and regrets and live for today. Seize the Moment! is your mini-guide to grab the present moment and live for today. It includes three bonus worksheets that will help you become more mindful. (Everyday mindfulness tips, practicing mindfulness, and becoming present for peace of mind.) Note: eReader not included.

https://www.vitalaging4women.com

The Unexpected Journey of Caring

7. Donna Thomson: The Unexpected Journey of Caring (hardcover book, $39.00 CAD value).

“The Unexpected Journey of Caring: The Transformation From Loved One to Caregiver” by Donna Thomson and Zachary White, PhD with a foreword by Judy Woodruff (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019) Available at all online booksellers Hardcover – $39.00 CAD)

With a foreword by Judy Woodruff, The Unexpected Journey of Caring is a practical guide to finding personal meaning in the 21st century care experience.

Personal transformation is usually an experience we actively seek out—not one that hunts us down. Becoming a caregiver is one transformation that comes at us, requiring us to rethink everything we once knew. Everything changes—responsibilities, beliefs, hopes, expectations, and relationships. Caregiving is not just a role reserved for “saints”—eventually, everyone is drafted into the caregiver role. It’s not a role people medically train for; it’s a new type of relationship initiated by a loved one’s need for care. And it’s a role that cannot be quarantined to home because it infuses all aspects of our lives.

Caregivers today find themselves in need of a crash course in new and unfamiliar skills. They must not only care for a loved one, but also access hidden community resources, collaborate with medical professionals, craft new narratives consistent with the changing nature of their care role, coordinate care with family, seek information and peer support using a variety of digital platforms, and negotiate social support—all while attempting to manage conflicts between work, life, and relationship roles. The moments that mark us in the transition from loved one to caregiver matter because if we don’t make sense of how we are being transformed, we risk undervaluing our care experiences, denying our evolving beliefs, becoming trapped by other’s misunderstandings, and feeling underappreciated, burned out, and overwhelmed.

Informed by original caregiver research and proven advocacy strategies, this book speaks to caregiving as it unfolds, in all of its confusion, chaos, and messiness. Readers won’t find well-intentioned clichés or care stereotypes in this book. There are no promises to help caregivers return to a life they knew before caregiving. No, this book greets caregivers where they are in their journey—new or chronic—not where others expect (or want) them to be.

“Nobody grows up planning to be a caregiver, but many of us will become one and sometimes when we least expect it. Thomson and White bring powerful insights to help understand what it means to be a caregiver and how to truly support those of us who will travel this unexpected journey.” – Samir K. Sinha, director of geriatrics, Sinai Health System and University Health Network, Toronto; health policy research director, National Institute on Ageing

www.donnathomson.com 

Keeping it Together

8. Eleanor Silverberg: “Keeping it Together: How to Cope as a Family Caregiver without Losing Your Sanity” (paperback, $20.00 CAD value)

https://www.eleanorsilverberg.com/kit-book

I Could Be Wrong

9. Billie Best: I Could Be Wrong (paperback, $7.99 USD value)

https://billiebest.com/

Contest Details:

  • Contest open to adults aged 18+, worldwide. No purchase necessary.
  • Identify which prize(s) you would like to win. Submit the item name/number, your name and email address to Angela at caretoage@gmail.com. (Your name and email address will not be given out to anyone else, unless it is required in order for you to obtain your prize(s)).
  • One entry per person, per item.
  • Entries accepted from Wednesday April 21, 2021 at 5:00 pm CST until Saturday May 15, 2021 at 12:00 noon CST.
  • Winners will be drawn on or before Sunday May 16, 2021 at 12:00 noon CST.
  • Qualified winners will be notified by email and your mailing address will be required so we can ship you your prize.
  • Every attempt will be made to get your prize to you, however, in the unfortunate event there are restrictions in your country, you will be ineligible. In that case, another draw will be made to seek a suitable winner.

Good luck!

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

www.angelaggentile.com

Addicted to Anti-Anxiety or “Nerve” Pills — Benzodiazepine use disorder and what to do about it

woman-3351794_1920

Image by Pete Linforth from Pixabay

Many people, especially women, develop feelings of anxiety and worry. Some call it “bad nerves.” This predisposition to feeling anxious can cause problems with everyday living, coping, and sleeping. I have assessed and interviewed many older people with a range of problems with anxiety. Feeling anxious is a completely normal reaction to stress or a situation where you may feel fearful. However, being in a continuous state of feeling afraid can cause problems both mentally and physically. Some say they feel like they are “trembling inside.”

Anti-anxiety medications (also known as “nerve pills”) are used by many people. These pills come from the family of “benzodiazepines.” Some of the commonly prescribed anxiolytics in Canada or the United States include (but not limited to):

  • Clonazepam (Rivotril)
  • Alprazolam (Xanax)
  • Lorazepam (Ativan)
  • Diazepam (Valium)

A commonly prescribed non-benzodiazepine that acts like one is Zopiclone (eszopiclone in the USA). It is commonly used as a “sleeping pill.”

Generally, benzodiazepines end in “pam” or “lam.” Use of these medications can initially improve symptoms by offering a sedating effect, however, they can also be addictive. Side effects of these drugs include increasing the risk of cognitive impairment, confusion, delirium, falls, fractures, drowsiness, and motor vehical accidents. They are not recommended for use by older adults. In fact, older people are recommended to gradually reduce their dosage (a slow and steady decrease is recommended over a sudden discontinuance due to withdrawal symptoms). Always talk to a doctor about any changes to your medication. As the dose is gradually reduced and preferably stopped, it is important to identify and optimize alternatives to managing any underlying issues. These alternatives are preferably not other medicines.

Sometimes these medications are used on an “as needed” basis. For example, if you are afraid of flying, and you need to go on an airplane, you can take one of these medications (prescribed by your doctor) to use in specific situations. Or, if you have claustrophobia and you need to go for a scan such as an MRI, taking this medication may make it more bearable.

I have also seen where these medications are prescribed for help with sleep. People who have an anxiety disorder may be prescribed this classification of medications to see if it helps reduce anxiety or panic attacks. In older people, antidepressants are the preferred class of medications to help with anxiety.

Some other key tips to remember:

  • Avoid taking benzodiazepines with opioids or alcohol.
  • These medications are more often prescribed to women (Almost 1 in 5 Canadian women report to have used in the past year).
  • Almost 1 in 10 Canadians in Quebec have been reported to have an addiction to benzodiazepines.
  • If a benzodiazepine addiction is present, consider there may also be other substance use disorders or behaviours present (e.g, alcohol, opioids, marijuana, gambling).
  • If you are older, it’s best not to start taking benzodiazepines.
  • If the addiction is getting worse, an admission to a treatment facility may be necessary.

If you are finding yourself feeling “addicted” or “dependent” on these medications (or other substances or behaviours), you are “craving” these drugs, or you are needing to increase your dosage, you may want to see your doctor to discuss alternatives. Reducing the risk of harm is key.

For more details, The Canadian Coalition for Seniors Mental Health has published the Canadian Guidelines on Benzodiazepine Receptor Agonist Use Disorder Among Older Adults (2019) and is found online: https://ccsmh.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Benzodiazepine_Receptor_Agonist_Use_Disorder_ENG.pdf

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

Low-Risk Alcohol Usage Guidelines for Older Adults – Know your limits

depth of field photography of woman in pastel color sleeveless shirt and white sunhat

Photo by bruce mars on Pexels.com

Most adults enjoy drinking alcohol on occasion. Sometimes, though, this occasional drink turns into a daily habit. One drink turns into two or more. If a person is not mindful, this habit could turn into an addiction. Addiction is also known as dependency or substance use disorder.

People can become addicted to not only alcohol but drugs, including prescription drugs (such as benzodiazepines and opiates). For example, nicotine, the drug found in cigarettes, is very addictive. Addictive behaviour can also be problematic, as in gambling, sex, or online gaming.

Addiction is a complex condition, a brain disease that is manifested by compulsive substance use despite harmful consequences. People with addiction (severe substance use disorder) have an intense focus on using a certain substance(s), such as alcohol or drugs, to the point that it takes over their life. They keep using alcohol or a drug even when they know it will cause problems. Yet a number of effective treatments are available and people can recover from addiction and lead normal, productive lives. – American Psychiatric Association, retrieved 03 Dec 2019.

For a number of reasons, it is essential to keep in mind that as we age, it is recommended we reduce our consumption of alcohol. For adults aged 65 and older, it is important to be aware of the low-risk guidelines.

Canada’s Low-Risk Guidelines (DrinkSense for Seniors) which is provided by the “Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction”, states that limits for adults (not older adults) who drink alcohol should be 10 drinks a week for women with no more than two per day, and 15 drinks a week for men with no more than three drinks a day on most days. There is no specific limit for older adults, but one of their “Safer Drinking Tips” includes the advice of “Always consider your age, body weight, and health problems that might suggest lower limits.”

standard-drink-picture_0

Standard Drink Portions:

      • Beer – 341 ml (12 oz.) of 5% alcohol content
      • Wine – 142 ml (5 oz.) of 12% alcohol content
      • Cider/Cooler – 341 m. (12 oz.) 5% alcohol content
      • Distilled alcohol/80 proof liquor (rye, gin, rum, vodka, etc.) – 43 ml (1.5 oz.) 40% alcohol content

Note: Not all wines are created equal. Some wines start at 5% alcohol content, some go as high as 18%!

I attended an “Aging and Addictions” course in November 2019 which was held by the Addictions Foundation of Manitoba, and they supported the drafted recommendations entitled “Prevention: Low-Risk Drinking Guidelines” for those 65 and older (noted below).

Low-Risk Drinking Limits (65+)

    • Women: No more than 1 standard drink per day, with no more than 5 drinks in total per week.
    • Men: No more than 1-2 standard drinks per day, with no more than 7 per week in total.
    • Non-drinking days are recommended every week.

Source: Canadian Coalition for Seniors’ Health. Canadian Guidelines for Older Adults. Prevention, Assessment, and Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder, 2019.

These drafted guidelines are more in line with what I would recommend. I have seen what alcohol dependence can do to people and it is heartbreaking. And as noted in a previous post here on my website, to help preserve cognitive health, experts recommend no more than 2-4 drinks per week (see my Memory Rescue book review.)

For those who have a drinking problem, there is often stigma and shame attached. Many people can’t abstain or reduce their drinking behaviour on their own (harm reduction) and need help. If you or someone you know has a drinking problem, addiction or dependence, please contact the Addictions Helpline in your area.

> Addictions Helpline Canada 

> Addictions Helpline USA

AA 12-Step (https://www.aa.org/) or Smart Recovery (https://www.smartrecovery.org/) are peer support options to consider as well.

If you are considering getting on top of your drinking problem and need someone to talk to, please contact me and I can assist you in finding the help you need.

Angela G. Gentile, MSW, RSW

References:

https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/addiction/what-is-addiction

https://amho.ca/wp-content/uploads/Mon-300pm-IP1-3a-Older-Adults-with-Alcohol-Related-Problems-Best-Practice-Guidelines.pdf

https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-use/get-help/get-help-problematic-substance-use.html

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/national-helpline

https://www.aa.org/

https://www.smartrecovery.org/

https://www.drinksenseab.ca/drinksense-tips/seniors/

https://ccsmh.ca/alcohol-guidelines/

“A Standard Drink” image source: https://studentaffairs.lehigh.edu/content/what-standard-drink